January 28

Bird Calls and Other Animal Sounds

When I was studying early childhood education in college, I observed skilled teachers at the campus elementary school. I’ll never forget my first visit for two reasons. I was standing nervously against the wall with my arms crossed when the veteran kindergarten teacher approached me, uncrossed my arms, and said, ” Your arms should always be down and ready to welcome children.” Such wisdom!

As I watched her, she gathered her students together and they began to identify recorded bird calls with amazing accuracy! She explained that this activity improved their auditory processing skills which were foundational for identifying the subtle differences in sounds when children read and write.

In my recent posts, I have suggested ways to use your sense of sight to discover and process the natural world, but in this post, let’s focus on the sense of hearing. On a walk or in your backyard, stop to listen. How many different sounds can you identify? In the second video below, learn to recognize bird calls.

Click here for the Safeshare link for the following video.

Click here for the SafeShare link.

Fun Fact: The call of the red-tailed hawk is often used in place of the bald eagle’s on television and movies because its call is much stronger than the eagle’s!

Click here to reference the Audubon’s encyclopedia of bird calls.

In this classic book, the owl tries to sleep, but the diurnal noises keep him awake. Young children will enjoy repeating the predictable text and laugh at the surprise ending. Use this book in a nocturnal unit and to introduce onomatopoeia, a word that phonetically imitates, resembles, or suggests the sound that it describes. It is a simple book to dramatize with instruments and bird calls. (Can you think of other sounds to add?)  Click here for the Safeshare link.

See the source image

 

Sing to Him, sing praise to Him; tell of all His wonderful acts.
Psalm 105:2